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Future School Project for the Web Rubric

Engaged Learning Lesson Rubric

Course Evaluation

Engaged Learning Lesson Rubric

 
Missing
Emerging
Advancing
Exceeding

Total Score

 
0
1-2
3-4
5-6
 

Lesson/Unit Components

Scenario
         
  All of the engaged learning portions are missing. Includes at least two of the following indicators of engaged learning:
  1. Students are explorers, producers of knowledge, teachers
  2. Teachers are facilitators, guides and co-learners
  3. Student are grouped in flexible, heterogeneous, and equitable groupings.
  4. Assessment is performance-based, generative, ongoing and equitable.
  5. Tasks are authentic, challenging, and multidisciplinary.
Includes at least three of the following indicators of engaged learning:
  1. Students are explorers, producers of knowledge, teachers
  2. Teachers are facilitators, guides and co-learners
  3. Student are grouped in flexible, heterogeneous, and equitable groupings.
  4. Assessment is performance-based, generative, ongoing and equitable.
  5. Tasks are authentic, challenging, and multidisciplinary.
Includes all of the following indicators of engaged learning:
  1. Students are explorers, producers of knowledge, teachers
  2. Teachers are facilitators, guides and co-learners
  3. Student are grouped in flexible, heterogeneous, and equitable groupings.
  4. Assessment is performance-based, generative, ongoing and equitable.
  5. Tasks are authentic, challenging, and multidisciplinary.
 
  There is no evidence of communication with others.

Includes at least one of the following:

  1. Mentors or collaborates with experts in the field being studied
  2. Uses the Internet for one or two-way communica-tion
  3. Uses the Internet for current information
  4. Information found is shared with others

Includes at least two of the following:

  1. Mentors or collaborates with experts in the field being studied
  2. Uses the Internet for one or two-way communication
  3. Uses the Internet for current information
  4. Information found is shared with others

Includes all of the following:

  1. Mentors or collaborates with experts in the field being studied
  2. Uses the Internet for one or two-way communica-tion
  3. Uses the Internet for current information
  4. Information found is shared with others
 

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There is little to no use of technology in the lesson/unit.

Includes at least two of the indicators of best use of technology:

  1. Access to technology is available and in sufficient amounts to provide for challenging tasks, opportunities, and experiences.
  2. The project is Internet dependent.
  3. Technology allows opportunities for collaborative work.
  4. The technology available is varied and easy to use information.

Includes at least three of the indicators of best use of technology:

  1. Access to technology is available and in sufficient amounts to provide for challenging tasks, opportunities, and experiences.
  2. The project is Internet dependent.
  3. Technology allows opportunities for collaborative work.
  4. The technology available is varied and easy to use

Includes all of the indicators of best use of technology:

  1. Access to technology is available and in sufficient amounts to provide for challenging tasks, opportunities, and experiences.
  2. The project is Internet dependent.
  3. Technology allows opportunities for collaborative work.
  4. The technology available is varied and easy to use
 
Teacher Pages One or more of the teacher pages are missing. There is some evidence of a lesson/unit proposal, presentation explanation, and pre-engaged learning lesson plan, but they have not been developed or are missing Teacher pages include a lesson/unit proposal, presentation explanation, and pre-engaged learning lesson plan, but one or more of them needs development. Teacher pages include a well developed and thought out lesson/unit proposal, presentation explanation, and pre-engaged learning lesson plan.  
Student Pages There is no evidence of a hook. Student pages contain a hook, but it does not create curiosity for the lesson or learning activity nor does it bear any relation to the lesson or learning activity. Student pages contain a hook which creates curiosity in some students for the lesson or learning activity. Student pages contain a well-developed hook, which creates curiosity in all students for the lesson or learning activity.  
  Student pages provide no guidance for students to proceed with the lesson/unit.

Student pages provide opportunities for students to do at least two of the following:

  1. control their own learning
  2. ask and answer their own questions,
  3. group and regroup as needed
  4. develop the skills needed to complete the lesson/unit
  5. collect, compile and synthesize data needed for the lesson/unit
  6. produce original products

Student pages provide opportunities for students to do at least three of the following:

  1. control their own learning
  2. ask and answer their own questions,
  3. group and regroup as needed
  4. develop the skills needed to complete the lesson/unit
  5. collect, compile and synthesize data needed for the lesson/unit
  6. produce original products

Student pages provide opportunities for students to do all of the following:

  1. control their own learning
  2. ask and answer their own questions,
  3. group and regroup as needed
  4. develop the skills needed to complete the lesson/unit
  5. collect, compile and synthesize data needed for the lesson/unit
  6. produce original products
 
  Student pages provide no opportunities for teachers to interact with students on the lesson/unit.

Student pages provide built-in opportunities for teachers to do at least one of the following:

  1. give students a place to start research by including appropriate links a variety of web sites
  2. encourage discussions, brainstorming and problem-solving
  3. provide for ongoing feedback
  4. assist students with questions or problem-solving when needed

Student pages provide built-in opportunities for teachers to do at two of the following:

  1. give students a place to start research by including appropriate links a variety of web sites
  2. encourage discussions, brainstorming and problem-solving
  3. provide for ongoing feedback
  4. assist students with questions or problem-solving when needed

Student pages provide well developed built-in opportunities for teachers to:

  1. give students a place to start research by including appropriate links a variety of web sites
  2. encourage discussions, brainstorming and problem-solving
  3. provide for ongoing feedback
  4. assist students with questions or problem-solving when needed
 

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Student pages do not contain any rubrics or rubric development opportunities for students. Student pages contain evidence of teacher developed rubrics for assessing student progress and products. Student pages contain minimal opportunities for students to assist in the process of rubric development for assessing student progress and products. Student pages contain well-developed opportunities for students to assist in the process of rubric development for assessing student progress and products.  

Curriculum/ Standards

Objectives There is no evidence of connection to educational objectives. There is some mention of educational objectives. There is adequate identification of educational objectives Educational objectives are clear, obtainable and measurable.  
Assessment There is no evidence of assessment strategies. There is some mention of assessment strategies. There is adequate identification of assessment strategies, but they are not alternative. Multiple and alternative assessment strategies are described.  
Task No task is identified. There is mention of a task, however, it is not a real world, authentic task.
The task does not advance students' knowledge of an important concept or principle.
An authentic task is identified.
The task does not advance students' knowledge of an important concept or principle.
An authentic, real world task, which is relevant to students, is identified.
The task advances students' knowledge/ understanding of an important concept or principle.
 
Multidisciplinary The lesson provides no connection to core curriculum or a standard course of study and/or to local, state or national standards. The lesson provides some connection to core curriculum with a few references to a course of study and at least local standards. The lesson provides clear connections to core curriculum with references to a course of study and some connection to local, state and/or national standards. The lesson supports the core curriculum content appropriate to the targeted student group and is well integrated with a course of study and clearly aligned with local and state or national standards.  

Engaged Learning

Student-Role The lesson is flat and uninspiring. There is no evidence of student choice or flexibility in pace, topic, or end product. The lesson is appealing, but student choice and flexibility is limited. The lesson is appealing and there is evidence of instructional flexibility and consideration of student interests. The lesson is appealing and it invites students to be creative. It supports student choice and encourages students to take responsibility for their learning and are encouraged to make their own decisions frequently.  
Teacher-Role The lesson/unit does not describe the role of the teacher. The lesson alludes to the teacher's role in a very general way. The lesson describes the specific activities of the teacher and how he/she is going to support student learning. The lesson describes the specific activities of the teacher and how he/she is going to support and assess student learning. Included are the teacher as facilitator and ongoing co-learner.  
Collaboration Neither students nor teachers worked as teams or partners in this lesson/unit.

Team groupings of students worked together on at least part of the lesson/unit.
A team of teachers may share some responsibility for the design and implementation of the lesson/unit.

Students are required to work on teams/groups for most of the lesson/unit.
The unit may be the effort of a team of teachers.
Students are required to work in changing teams/groups for most of the lesson/unit.
The unit is clearly the effort of a team of teachers, whether they are in the same building or across the country.
 
Data Gathering All data is gathered from information in the classroom or no data gathering is evident. Classes depend on gathering data or input from local sources only, using at least two methods. Classes depend on gathering data or input from at least one geographically distant partner using a number of methods. Classes depend on gathering data or input from a number of geographically distant partners using a number of methods.  
Instructional Design The lesson/unit is sketchy or incomplete. The lesson/unit is complete, but lacks depth.
There are no provisions for students with special needs or learning style preferences.
The lesson/unit is complete and goes into depth.
There are no provisions for students with special needs or learning style preferences.
The lesson/unit is complete and goes into depth.
There are provisions for students with special needs, as well as students with learning style preferences.
 
Assessment The is little or no evidence of assessment strategies.

At least one of the following is true:

  1. Strategies are in place to assess students' prior knowledge and previous skill development with regard to this unit.
  2. Students are involved with creating assessment rubrics for the lesson/unit.
  3. Learner outcomes, activities and assessment rubrics are consistent with each other.
  4. Assessment is frequent and students are given constant feedback.
  5. Students have regular opportunities to reflect on their own progress.

At least three of the following are true:

  1. Strategies are in place to assess students' prior knowledge and previous skill development with regard to this unit.
  2. Students are involved with creating assessment rubrics for the lesson/unit.
  3. Learner outcomes, activities and assessment rubrics are consistent with each other.
  4. Assessment is frequent and students are given constant feedback.
  5. Students have regular opportunities to reflect on their own progress.

All of the following are true:

  1. Strategies are in place to assess students' prior knowledge and previous skill development with regard to this unit.
  2. Students are involved with creating assessment rubrics for the lesson/unit.
  3. Learner outcomes, activities and assessment rubrics are consistent with each other.
  4. Assessment is frequent and students are given constant feedback.
  5. Students have regular opportunities to reflect on their own progress.
 

Best Use of Technology

Importance Technology is not an integral part of the lesson/unit. Tasks can be accomplished as easily and effectively without the use of technology. Technology is an enabling tool, not the content of the project. Technology is used infrequently for a few tasks. Most tasks can be accomplished without the use of technology.
There is infrequent use of technology for some students or groups.Technology is an enabling tool, not the content of the project
Technology is used for many activities.
There is regular individual and group use of technology for most students. Technology is an enabling tool, not the content of the project.
The project would not be feasible or as effective without the almost constant use of technology.
There is regular individual and group use of technology for all students, when needed. Technology is the content of the project, not an enabling tool.
 
Use of the Internet The lesson/unit's use of the Internet treats students as passive recipients of information, is not well defined, or is a trivial use of the medium. The lesson/unit's use of the Internet is focused and may originate from a teacher designed web site. The lesson/unit's use of the Internet helps students achieve goals by actively involving them in searching for information or communicating with peers or experts. The lesson/unit's use of the Internet helps students achieve goals by actively involving them in searching for information or communicating with peers or experts AND synthesizing information and data into a presentation that is published online.  
Communication There is no communication with peers or experts to increase understanding. A few students communicate with peers and experts on an irregular basis to increase understanding. All students communicate with peers and experts on a regular basis to increase understanding. All students communicate with peers and experts on a regular basis to increase understanding.  
Contribution Each student or each group researches its own information. Students share a few of their findings with other groups. Students share most of their findings with other groups. Students share all of their findings with other groups.  
Information Access Teachers access and manage all information to be used by the students. Students access information that is pertinent to their topic.
Teachers manage information found by the students.
Students access and manage information that is pertinent to their topic. Students access and manage information that is pertinent to their topic.  
Final Projects Final projects are presented to the teacher as a written or oral presentation with no use of technology. Final projects, created using technology in the form of multimedia presentations are presented to the teacher and/or the immediate class. Final projects, created using technology in the form of multimedia presentations or web presences, are presented to the teacher and/or the immediate class. Final projects, created using technology in the form of multimedia presentations or web presences, are communicated to an audience wider than just the teacher and the immadiate class. (E.g. Community/City Government/Special interest Groups, etc.)  

Web Page Design

Visual Appearance/ Organization The layout has no structure or organization.
Backgrounds, if used conflict with text.
Page is difficult to navigate.
Text is broken into paragraphs and/or sections.
Backgrounds work with text, but do little to enhance the overall effectiveness of the page.
Page is difficult to navigate.
Text is broken into paragraphs and/or sections. Headings label sections and create some hierarchy and consistency.
Backgrounds work with text, but do little to enhance the overall effectiveness of the page.
Page is relatively easy to navigate.
There is a consistent format from page-to-page.
Text is broken into paragraphs and/or sections. Headings label sections and create an easy to understand hierarchy and consistency.
Backgrounds enhance the text and the overall effectiveness of the page.
Page is easy to navigate.
 
Text The written text is difficult to understand and does not stick to the topic.
There are spelling and/or grammar errors.
The written text is easy to understand.
There are spelling and grammar errors.
The written text is easy to understand.
There are no spelling errors, but one or more grammar or syntax errors.
The text is clear, concise, and well written.
There are no spelling or grammar errors.
 
Graphics Graphics, if used, are not related to page content.
Graphics (size and type) used make loading of pages very slow.
Too many graphics.
Graphics show some relation to page content.
Graphics (size and type) used make loading of pages very slow.
Too many graphics.
Graphics enhance the page.
Graphics (size and type) used make loading of pages very slow.
Graphics enhance the page.
Images are proper size, resolution and coloring.
Graphics are used as links.
 
Links Links are either missing, inactive, or do not work. Some links work, but some are not active or are missing.
Return links are not always provided.
Most links work or are activated.
Some return links are provided and work.
All links are present, active and work.
Return links are consistently provided and work.
 

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Total Score
 

 



Created for the Fermilab LInC program sponsored by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Education Office and Friends of Fermilab, and funded by United States Department of Energy, Illinois State Board of Education, North Central Regional Technology in Education Consortium which is operated by North Central Regional Educational Laboratory (NCREL), and the National Science Foundation.

Author(s): Barbara Holdiman, Gina Keifer, and Lucianne Sweder
Lincoln-Way High School District 210, New Lenox, IL
Lockport High School District 205, Lockport, IL
Professional Development Alliance/Regional Office of Education for Will and Grundy/Kendall Counties, Joliet, IL
Learning Technology Center One South, Joliet, IL
Created: February 25, 2001 - Updated: March 31, 2001
http://www-ed.fnal.gov/lincon/w01/projects/futureschool/rubricspage.htm