Ed Home - TRC Home - sciencelines Index - Spring 2001

Chocolate Chip Mining with Science Brainium

Learning Outcomes

It is expected that students will:

Time

Materials

Prerequisite Knowledge and Skills

Students should be able to:

Pre-Planning

Here We Go:

Presentation Suggestions

Answers to Procedure Questions:

Student predictions will vary.
Student chip number will vary.
Student descriptions will vary. The cookie is usually destroyed.
Student predictions will vary.
Student chip number will vary.
Student descriptions will vary. The cookie is usually in better condition than the first time.

Answers to Investigation Questions:

The first method produced the most chocolate chips. The second method produced the least chocolate chips.

The second method produced the least damage. The first method produced the most damage.

Student processes will vary. Some students will destroy the entire cookie first, then pick the chocolate chips out. Other students will try to get each individual chocolate chip out one at a time.

The mining of energy resources can have a great impact on the environment. The two mining methods are at the ends of a spectrum. Mining companies (and society) try to balance the need for energy resources and preserving the environment. It is up to society to decide where along the spectrum we should draw the line for mining non-living resources.

Student answers will vary. If we try to conserve the environment, we may have fewer energy resources and/or we might have to pay more for them.
Student answers will vary. This is a good way to find out how students feel about the environment.
Student research will vary. They should be able to research current mining techniques.

See "Background Information," "Following It Up" and "Meeting Individual Needs."

 Student Sheet

 Teacher Information